Documenting nature in the Amazon through photographs and sketches

Tropical forest

Balbina and the blue-headed parrots

Last month we went for a weekend trip to Balbina, the main attraction was fishing for tucunare in the Balbina dam. I didn’t go fishing though. I stayed in the town, Balbina, and went for a walk around, until the edge of town.  I could see the lake formed by the dam, and the dead trees on the lake.  The dam was built to provide energy to Manaus, as a renewable source, however it emits so much methane that it turns out to be worst than a coal plant. I’ve written about that before (Weekend trip to Balbina). There is another view of the tree trunks on that post.

While looking at the lake, I could also hear a lot of parrots, and eventually saw a few of them.  Blue-headed parrots (Pionus menstruus) were flying around, and some were resting on the canopy of nearby trees.

Balbina, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

Balbina, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

Balbina, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

Balbina, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

Balbina, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

Balbina, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas


Cachoeiras – day trip to the waterfalls

Last Sunday we went on a day trip to Presidente Figueiredo with a group from Fotografia Manaus.  It was a great trip, we discovered some new sites and had a great time.  Here are a first set of photographs from the trip.

Cachoeiras - day trip to the waterfalls

Cachoeira das Araras, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

Cachoeira Araras derecha 15Sep2013

Cachoeira das Araras, Presidente Figueiredo, Amazonas

en el agua 15Sep2013


Is it a jaguar?

As we went into the forest last week, we stopped a couple of times to photograph trees and flowers.  In one spot, we saw tracks on the road. I think they were from a jaguar, but it could also have been a mountain lion. A big cat for sure! Very exciting.  My husband saw a black jaguar crossing the road near that spot a few months ago.

Image


Red flower

We saw many flowers like this, however most of them were up on the trees where the vines tangle around and go up into the canopy.   This vine was growing on the floor next to the dirt road and we could take a close look at it.  Many ants were on the flower, and some bees were visiting it too.

Red flowerjpg


blue weevil!

Last weekend we went for a walk to the Bosque da Ciencia. It was a short visit but we found a beautiful beetle, a blue weevil!   It is a broad-nosed weevil (Curculionidae: Entiminae) with some blue on its legs and antenna.

Entiminae


Brazilian coloured beetle

This weekend we went for a walk to the Reserva Duke, in the northern part of Manaus. Part of the reserve is a botanical garden (Jardim Botanico) with nice trails in the forest and new exhibition areas in the forest.  I really liked the little pirarucu we saw, it was just a few months old, and about 20 cm long.  I will write a post about them later on.  While we were looking at the exhibit about frogs and toads, I saw a beetle on the floor.  I stopped paying attention to the frogs at that point.  Here’s what I saw:

 

 

Scarab

 

Scarab complete

Jardim Botanico, Reserva Duke, Manaus

 

 

 


Into the forest

Into the forest

On our way to the research site. It is a long road through the forest.  When one is lucky some animals can be seen crossing the road, ant eaters, wild boars, and last week a black jaguar! I wish I had been there.


Peixe-boi

Amazon or South American manatee (Trichechus inunguis) is commonly hunted for meat and oil along the Amazon River. I don’t know how people manage to find them, but they do, and it is common that little ones are left without their mothers. They also get hurt by the boats. There are programs to help manatee populations recover and to reintroduce them in some areas with support of the local people. Researchers at INPA are also working on this. This photograph was taken at the Bosque da Ciencia where some manatees are brought in for recovery.

Trichechus inunguis

Bosque da Ciencia, Manaus, Amazonas

 


brown pale-fronted capuchin

Last year, on my birthday, I went on a boat trip on the Amazon. We made a stop at a floating restaurant, and nearby we saw a group of brown pale-fronted capuchins (Cebus albifrons (Humboldt, 1812)).

brown pale fronted capuchin Capuchin couple Capuchin drinking


Guan couple

Two weeks ago I saw a couple of Guan on the mango tree in our garden.  We’ve identified them as Spix’s guan (Jacu-de-spix)
Penelope jacquacu.  The one on the left was cutting leaves of maracuya and giving them to the one on the right. After a while they each rested on separate branches of the tree. It was the first time I saw them, and I haven’t seen them back since.

Spix's guan

guan resting